Mar 302014
 

Posted by greydogg, 99GetSmart

Ad Pic INAA at Humber, May 2014

Late Spring Period, May of 2014

Symposia Period: Monday 12th to Monday 26th of May

Institutional Partner: Humber College

Venue: Humber Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning, Lakeshore Campus 

City: Toronto, Ontario, Canada

————————————————————————–

Speed, Silence and Solitude (SSS)

Symposium: 1st

Research Program: Space, Time and New Technologies of the Self

Dates: Saturday 24th to Monday 26th of May, 2014

(Abstract Deadline: Friday 25th of April, Paper Due: Friday 9th of May)

General Break: Tuesday 28th of May, 2014

* Full information below

————————————————————————–

1st International Symposium: Speed, Silence and Solitude

Part of the Research Program on: Space, Time and New Technologies of the Self

International Network for Alternative Academia – Extends a general invitation to participate

Enquiries: acc@alternative-academia.net

Saturday 24th to Monday 26th of May, 2014

Institutional Partner: Humber ITAL

Venue: Humber Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning

Lakeshore Campus (Building: Lakeshore Commons)

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Call for Papers

(Abstract Submission Period Opened: Monday 14th of October, 2013)

(Abstract Deadline: Friday 25th of April, 2014)

This trans-disciplinary research project is interested in exploring how new technologies are re-calibrating our notion of time, re-configuring our ideas of space and, as a result, how they are re-envisioning our understanding of the self and its relation to others.

From smartphones to tablets, from Apps to Twitter, the new technologies and the social media to which they have given rise increasingly occupy our time and mediate our relationships. They encourage us to develop fast friends, guide us as to locate fast food, even helps us to find places to practice fast yoga. They keep us ever in the presence of others, always connected, ever accessible. We find ourselves amongst those who are rushing to catch up on what they have always already been behind on starting. It is a world in which speed has become the measure of all things, in which silence is rare, and in which solitude has at one and the same time become hard to find and difficult to escape. How are these experiences reshaping the way we perceive the world, see ourselves and relate to others?

We invite colleagues from all disciplines and professions interested in exploring and explaining these issues in a collective, deliberative and dialogical environment to send presentation proposals that address these general questions or the following themes:

1. Speed

- How are our conceptions of time being recalibrated?

- What has happened to our concept of leisure?

- Have we lost the ability to look, to linger, to be bored? With what consequences?

- How has our new conception of time affected rituals and relationships? What affects has our new conception of time had upon our rituals and relationships?

- What are the advantages and disadvantages of the new cult of speed? What are we hurrying up for? What are we hurrying to escape?

- What is the impact of the “slow movement”?

- We seem in a rush in order to save time. But for what are we saving time? Can time be saved?

- What is the relationship between speed and mortality? Do our new notions of time better prepare and equip us to deal with our mortality? Are we attempting to outrace and outwit time?

- What are the relationships between acceleration, efficiency and effectiveness?

- Traditional metaphors of time no longer seem adequate. Time no longer seems to be like a river or an ocean. What new metaphors seem apt to capture 21st century notions of time?

- How has the new conception of time affected our perception of duration, anticipation and waiting? What has it done to patience?

- What new experiences does speed afford us? What experiences does it undermine?

- How do we conceptualize and measure slowness in the 21st century?

2. Silence

- What is the value of silence?

- Is silence any longer a possibility? Is it achievable?

- In what ways are the new media changing our experience of silence? Have we lost language-free/sound-free space? Have we wanted to?

- How are our understandings and valuing of introspection, reflection and thought being reconceived in a world filled with sound?

- It seems the new media at one and the same time are making it ever harder to find silent moments and ever more difficult to escape. How can these simultaneous yet opposing experiences be explained?

- How does hearing differ from listening? Are we witnessing the evolution of listening with the rise of new technologies?

- What does silence sound like? Can silence be conceptualized? How can it be captured in words? How is it captured in music?

3. Solitude

- How does solitude differ from loneliness? How does it differ from boredom?

- What are the effects of our new experiences of being ‘alone together’?

- What are the conditions for the possibility of solitude? Can these conditions be met in the 21st century?

- What underlies our desire for solitude?

- When do we seek solitude? Why do we sometimes fear it?

- How is new media encouraging solitude? How is it undermining solitude? How can these opposing effects be explained?

- How is our experience of travel and of vacation changing in response to a world always populated with others and other tourists? How much are we willing to pay to experience solitude?

- How are our notions of space being reconfigured in a world where there are always others?

- In a world always already populated with others, how are creativity, imagination and innovation being reconceived?

If you are interested in participating in this Annual Symposium, submit a 400 to 500 word abstract as soon as possible and no later than Friday 25th of April, 2014. (For justifiable cases, we do uphold a tolerance period of fifteen days.)

Please use the following template for your submission:

First: Author(s);

Second: Affiliation, if any;

Third: Email Address;

Fourth: Title of Abstract and Proposal;

Fifth: The 400 to 500 Word Abstract.

To submit an abstract online follow these steps:

1) Go to our webpage: www.alternative-academia.net

2) Select your Symposium of choice within the list of annual events (listed by period and city)

3) Go to LOG IN at the top of the page

4) Create a User Name and Password for our system and log in

5) Click on the Call for Papers for the Symposium

6) Go to the end of the Call for Papers page and click on the First Step of Submission Process button

7) Follow the instructions provided for completing the abstract submission process

For every abstract proposal submitted, we acknowledge receipt. If you do not receive a reply from us within three days, you should assume the submission process was not completed successfully. Please try again or contact our technical support for clarifications.

All presentation and paper proposals that address these questions and issues will be fully considered and evaluated. Evaluation of abstract submissions will be ongoing, from the opening date of Monday 14th of October, 2013. All Prospective Delegates can expect a reply time to their submission of three weeks.

Accepted abstracts will require a full draft paper by Friday 9th of May, 2014. Papers are for a 20 minute presentation, 8 to 10 pages long, double spaced, Times New Roman 12. All papers presented at the symposium are eligible for publication as part of a digital or paperback book.

We invite colleagues and people interested in participating to disseminate this call for papers. Thank you for sharing and cross-listing where and whenever appropriate.

Hope to meet you in Toronto!

Symposium Coordinators:

Wendy O’Brien

Professor of Social and Political Theory

School of Liberal Studies

Humber Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Email: Wendy.OBrien@humber.ca

Alejandro Cervantes-Carson

General Coordinator

International Network for Alternative Academia

Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain

Email: acc@alternative-academia.net

*****

Informational Note:

Alternative Academia is an international network of intellectuals, academics, independent scholars and practitioners committed to creating spaces, both within and beyond traditional academe, for creative, trans-disciplinary and critical thinking on current debates and key themes. We offer annual and biannual symposiums at sites around the world, providing forums that foster the development of new frames of reference and innovative structures for the production and expansion of knowledge. Dialogue, discussion and deliberation define both the methods employed and the values upheld by this network.

Visit our website at: www.alternative-academia.net

 

Mar 292014
 

Posted by greydogg, 99GetSmart

Ad Pic INAA at Humber, May 2014

Late Spring Period, May of 2014

Symposia Period: Monday 12th to Monday 26th of May

Institutional Partner: Humber College

Venue: Humber Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning, Lakeshore Campus 

City: Toronto, Ontario, Canada

————————————————————————–

Creating Characters, Inventing Lives: The Art of the Self (CCIL)

Symposium: 1st

Research Program: Aesthetic Lives, Artistic Selves

Dates: Tuesday 20th to Thursday 22nd of May, 2014

(Abstract Deadline: Monday 21st of April, Paper Due: Monday 5th of May)

General Break: Friday 23rd of May, 2014

* Full information below

————————————————————————–

1st International Symposium: Creating Characters, Inventing Lives: The Art of the Self

Part of the Research Program on: Aesthetic Lives, Artistic Selves

International Network for Alternative Academia – Extends a general invitation to participate

Enquiries: acc@alternative-academia.net

Tuesday 20th to Thursday 22nd of May, 2014

Institutional Partner: Humber ITAL

Venue: Humber Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning

Lakeshore Campus (Building: Lakeshore Commons)

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Call for Papers

(Abstract Submission Period Opened: Monday 14th of October, 2013)

(Abstract Deadline: Monday 21st of April, 2014)

This trans-disciplinary research project is interested in exploring the lessons we can derive from the creative process and identify how productive it is beyond the boundaries of the work and creation itself.

Regardless of our awareness, our understanding of our selves, we have always been the product of creation – the result of the playful and subversive blurring of the boundaries between fiction and life, between self and other, between fantasy and reality. Who we are – how we tell the story of our lives – has always traversed the divides between artistic invention, personal reflection and historic fact; being as much the product of the creative process as the characters depicted by artists in their works. Yet, we have been resistant to this notion holding fast to the idea that the bonds between us are intransigent, that the self is impermeable to transformation, clinging to the idea of authenticity. New models of the self are necessitated — models that emphasize the creative and transformative process by which the self is created. This project locates this search at the intersection of artistic invention and theoretical reflection. What can we learn from the creation of characters about our sense of the real, the construction of self and our bonds with others? In what ways do these processes overlap? How do they diverge?

We invite colleagues from all disciplines and professions interested in exploring and explaining these issues in a collective, deliberative and dialogical environment to send presentation proposals that address these general questions or the following themes:

1. Boundary Playfulness (or Playing with Boundaries): Fiction and The Real

- Why do we create: to become, to be, to reveal, to conceive of our lives differently, to compensate what we do not have but want dearly, to conceal our flaws, to work through our weaknesses, to rediscover and, perhaps even, reinvent our selves and the bonds we have with others, to live a life we do not have and will never have?

- How do boundaries of life, context, intimacy and identity change in the act of creating and the emergence of a creation?

- Should we care about boundary modifications and movements between fiction and the real? Does it matter if one dimension seeps into the other?

- Where do the boundaries between fiction and reality stand? Do these still hold and how can one conceive, today, of these boundaries?

- How are notions of the real affected by the creation of characters, by the creation of other realities or the mimicry of the real, by the multiplication of what becomes fiction and reality?

- What is left of the identity of the creator after the process of creation? Is there a transference of both meaning and the site of recognition from the person to the creative work? How is identity modified and transformed?

- Is fiction (sometimes) more real than what we call reality? How does that happen and what can we learn from those unique experiences?

2. Life and Biography: Always Present

- Do I create because in the act of creating I would love or hope to become? Is it the fear of nothingness that moves me to create?

- Can we create without letting self and biography seep in or bluntly take over? Is this really a problem?

- How does the act of creating characters become an act of reflecting self and biography? Can this be different?

- Does the self become exposed, explored, consolidated and enhanced in and with the act of creating?

- Is creating therapeutically legitimate or a hoax for psychological therapy?

- What is autobiography? What is autobiographical creation? Is it the transference of identity from body to creation or the act of creating a new self? How does an author and artist relate to his/her autobiography or autobiographical work?

- How does the creative work itself constitute an experience of estrangement from the author and artist? Does the work become a haven offering protection from the world? Does it estrange the creator once it becomes independent, dislocated from the author or artist?

3. Authorship, Authenticity and Authority

- Don’t we all borrow from each other, from the long and deep traditions, from the canonical, from the new and yet to be acknowledged?

- Should we abandon tropes of the authentic and authenticity? Should we redefine what we mean today by authenticity? What meaning might it carry currently for the process of creation and in the creative work?

- How do power relations play into the notion of the authentic and authorship?

- Do creators and artists really know what effect their work will have? Should we call this pursuit off?

- Why do we still believe that the author, creator, artist has to have the last word on the meaning of their work, of their creation? Is there any legitimacy in this idea or claim?

- Is not meaning born by way and through the dialogue that happens with an audience, reader, listener, observer, interpreter, consumer of the creative piece and work?

- Can we live with a world of meaning unhinged from the author’s intention and actions?

- How is the new media altering, in significant ways, the creative process? How is it redefining the meaning of “creator”? How are the boundaries between the creator and the created being redefined?

- What effects does new media have over the creative bond between writer and reader, playwright and audience, painter and gallery visitor, filmmaker and cinema or video audience, music composer and listener, creator and consumer?

- How has electronic media transformed notions of the authentic and unique?

4. Success and Failure: A History of Recognition?

- In the world of historic value, why is death the best event for recognition? How can we reverse the set of principles that go into recognizing the greatness of authors and creators once they cannot speak, they cannot talk back?

- Is there any virtue in changing or reversing that logic: recognition in life?

- How are links made between recognition and success?

- What are the measures of success and how do these relate to recognition? Are these measures good for the recognition of creators and creative work; for fostering creators?

- How does the artist, the author, the creator understand perfection? What are the perversions of ideas and myths linked to perfection?

- Is there a perfect creation? Is there perfection in the creative process?

- What is the place of failure and the fear of failure in today’s creative process?

- What is an author prepared to do in order to achieve success? Would these be the same in order to obtain recognition?

- How much does recognition and success impact the creative process? Has this changed over time and through history?

- Is it possible to argue that both recognition and success are and have always been substantive parts and endless motivators for the creative process? What about failure and the fear of failure?

5.  Myths of Creation

- How has inspiration survived the pass of time and history? How much do we still believe or hold on to notions of inspiration? What are the current ideas that circulate and inhabit creators’ minds and lives?

-Is there a place for inspiration today? What kind of definition would it have? What kind of re-tooling would it require in order to have acceptance and legitimacy?

- Does inspiration require legitimation?

- What or who is a muse or a nymph? Where do they live and what territories to they inhabit? Why do they decide to hide from the naked eye?

- What is the current place of old and new mythologies in the creative process?

- How do “Narcissus” and “Pygmalion” make their presence known in creations and creative processes?

- What about other mythological figures that have found current embodiments?

- How do authors, creators and artists contribute to the reproduction of mythologies?

- Are mythologies eternal and substantial to creation itself and to the system of belief that foster creative, critical and artistic work?

If you are interested in participating in this Annual Symposium, submit a 400 to 500 word abstract as soon as possible and no later than Monday 21st of April, 2014. (For justifiable cases, we do uphold a tolerance period of fifteen days.)

Please use the following template for your submission:

First: Author(s);

Second: Affiliation, if any;

Third: Email Address;

Fourth: Title of Abstract and Proposal;

Fifth: The 400 to 500 Word Abstract.

To submit an abstract online follow these steps:

1) Go to our webpage: www.alternative-academia.net

2) Select your Symposium of choice within the list of annual events (listed by period and city)

3) Go to LOG IN at the top of the page

4) Create a User Name and Password for our system and log in

5) Click on the Call for Papers for the Symposium

6) Go to the end of the Call for Papers page and click on the First Step of Submission Process button

7) Follow the instructions provided for completing the abstract submission process

For every abstract proposal submitted, we acknowledge receipt. If you do not receive a reply from us within three days, you should assume the submission process was not completed successfully. Please try again or contact our technical support for clarifications.

All presentation and paper proposals that address these questions and issues will be fully considered and evaluated. Evaluation of abstract submissions will be ongoing, from the opening date of Monday 14th of October, 2013. All Prospective Delegates can expect a reply time to their submission of three weeks.

Accepted abstracts will require a full draft paper by Monday 5th of May, 2014. Papers are for a 20 minute presentation, 8 to 10 pages long, double spaced, Times New Roman 12. All papers presented at the symposium are eligible for publication as part of a digital or paperback book.

We invite colleagues and people interested in participating to disseminate this call for papers. Thank you for sharing and cross-listing where and whenever appropriate.

Hope to meet you in Toronto!

Symposium Coordinators:

Wendy O’Brien

Professor of Social and Political Theory

School of Liberal Studies

Humber Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Email: Wendy.OBrien@humber.ca

Oana Strugaru

Faculty of Letters and Communication Sciences

Stefan cel Mare University

Suceava, Romania

Email: oana_andriese@yahoo.com

Alejandro Cervantes-Carson

General Coordinator

International Network for Alternative Academia

Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain

Email: acc@alternative-academia.net

*****

Informational Note:

Alternative Academia is an international network of intellectuals, academics, independent scholars and practitioners committed to creating spaces, both within and beyond traditional academe, for creative, trans-disciplinary and critical thinking on current debates and key themes. We offer annual and biannual symposiums at sites around the world, providing forums that foster the development of new frames of reference and innovative structures for the production and expansion of knowledge. Dialogue, discussion and deliberation define both the methods employed and the values upheld by this network.

Visit our website at: www.alternative-academia.net

Mar 282014
 

Posted by greydogg, 99GetSmart

Ad Pic INAA at Humber, May 2014

Late Spring Period, May of 2014

Symposia Period: Monday 12th to Monday 26th of May

Institutional Partner: Humber College

Venue: Humber Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning, Lakeshore Campus 

City: Toronto, Ontario, Canada

————————————————————————–

Hope, Betrayal and Trust (HBT)

Symposium: 1st

Research Program: Lost Virtues, Found Vices

Dates: Friday 16th to Sunday 18th of May, 2014

(Abstract Deadline: Friday 18th of April, Paper Due: Friday 2nd of May)

General Break: Monday 19th of May, 2014

* Full information below

————————————————————————–

1st International Symposium: Hope, Betrayal and Trust (HBT)

Part of the Research Program on: Lost Virtues, Found Vices

International Network for Alternative Academia – Extends a general invitation to participate

Enquiries: acc@alternative-academia.net

Friday 16th to Sunday 18th of May, 2014

Institutional Partner: Humber ITAL

Venue: Humber Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning

Lakeshore Campus (Building: Lakeshore Commons)

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Call for Papers

(Abstract Submission Period Opened: Monday 14th of October, 2013)

(Abstract Deadline: Friday 18th of April, 2014)

This trans-disciplinary research project is interested in exploring the complex and fluid relationships between hope and trust, and how might betrayal play a productive role in this bond.

As concepts, ideas or simple notions, hope and trust seem to have simultaneously lost contemporary currency while being ever more necessary in our every day lives. We seem resigned to a kind of hopelessness, seem unwilling to trust others and are ready and willing to betray whomever we might need to in order to advance our own careers or personal agendas. Yet new technologies require us to place personal information online, to communicate with strangers, and to hold onto the promise of happiness. How are our maintenance of hope, our need to trust and our willingness to betray intertwined? How are these concepts evolving? In shifting our notions of the possible, challenging our understanding of the bonds between us, and framing our need to remember and to forget, how are these new conceptions redefining our notions of the moral self and of ethical beings?

We invite colleagues from all disciplines and professions interested in exploring and explaining these issues in a collective, deliberative and dialogical environment to send presentation proposals that address these general questions or the following themes:

1. On Hope: Fluidity and Substance

- What is hope: an act, a sensation, a cluster of expectations, a feeling, a desire, an orientation?

- What place does hope have in our lives? Why do we hold on to the idea of hope?

- Is hope a characteristic and quality of certain societies and cultures? Is it a consequence of certain historical circumstances?

- How is hope constructed culturally and how does it translate into the experience and lives of groups and individuals?

- Does hope have social currency or value today?

- Are there lessons from the past or from cultures foreign to us that require our attention and critical understanding?

- How does hope relate to myths and superstitions? And how might it relate to a sense of reality and to forms of identity?

- Is hope a form of belonging?

- How does hope relate to faith and religion?

- What kind of principles and symbols inhabit definitions of hope and how are these accepted and shared among members of groups and communities?

- How do we perceive, conceive and evaluate hope in others?

2. The Possible and The Impossible

- What are the conditions for the possibility of hope?

- What discursive role does hope have in our lives?

- How does hope relate to time, temporality and chronology?

- How might hope relate to the past, present and future?

- Is hope always oriented to the future or to a general sense of the future? And if so, what does it require from the past and from the present?

- How does hope relate to the possible, the feasible and the realizable?

- What is the relationship between desire and hope? How do they shape and inform each other?

- What about desiring the impossible?

- Should hope have limits?

- Must hope be grounded in the possible? Can we hope for the impossible?

3. On Trust and Trusting

- What is the history of trust and how is trust established?

- How are new technologies and changes in social relations affecting our understanding of trust? How are they changing our definitions of trust and our experiences of trusting?

- How do we navigate in a world in which we are forced to trust more people at greater distances from us geographically, politically, socially?

- How has our understanding of the meaning and the requisites for trust evolved?

- What is the relationship between security and trust?

- Can one trust oneself?

4. Betrayal and Trust: A History of Politics? 

- Can trust exist without the potential for betrayal? Is trust always a risk?

- What are the relationships between betrayal, trust, loyalty and love?

- How are these concepts related on a personal level? How are they enacted in politics?

- How do trust and betrayal relate to power and privilege?

- What are the conditions for the possibility of trust?

- What arguments and explanations do we deploy for trusting and betraying? Are they fundamentally the same for trust than for betrayal or do they belong to different domains and logics?

- What is the importance of intersubjectivity for trust? To what degree is betrayal intersubjective?

- What is the logic of betrayal? How is it related to the logic of the promise?

- Why is there a willingness for us to betray and a hesitation to believe we have been betrayed?

- What are the limits of loyalty?

- How do acts of remembering and of forgetting inform betrayal?

- Is betrayal avoidable?

5. The Bonds Between Us

- What is the nature of the bond in hope, betrayal and trust?

- Which binds us more tightly to others – trust or doubt?

- Regardless of feasibility, does hope require trust? Does trust require hope?

- Are the conditions for the possibility of trust, also necessary for hope?

- Does hope entail responsibility? What is the relationship between these two concepts?

- Can hope exist without the basic agreements that enable trust and also make possible betrayal?

- To what degree and in what way does hope depend on betrayal or the existence of the motivation to betray?

- What are the bonds created between the betrayer and the betrayed?

- Does betrayal, in any of its forms, renovate the need for hope, as it does for trust?

- Defending and upholding agreements generate the continuation of trust; is there something similar that happens in the domain of hope?

-Whether formal or informal, betrayal cannot exist before agreements; is there an equivalent with hope?

- Are disturbances in communication and understanding good territories for betrayal, for feeling betrayed, for perceiving betrayal in that action of others?

- Is trust and hope possible in a context of communicative disturbances?

6. Hopelessness? 

- What are the conditions for the possibility of hopelessness?

- How would we live a life structured by constant threats of betrayal?

- Does hope have a place within strategic thinking and instrumental reason? How would we describe this place?

- How do hope and hopelessness relate to social, cultural and economic privilege? And how do they relate to disempowerment, destitution, marginalization and extreme poverty?

- How are hope and justice linked? What are the effects of each on the other?

- What are the problems with living a life devoid of hope or driven by hopelessness?

- Do we have or can we conceive of a space for the possibility of deciding to live embracing hopelessness?

- How would we understand an unrestricted and unconstrained personal choice to abandon hope altogether? Could we empathically respect this decision?

- Are there “false” hopes? Are all hopes “true”?

- What is the relationship between hopelessness, cynicism and despair?

If you are interested in participating in this Annual Symposium, submit a 400 to 500 word abstract as soon as possible and no later than Friday 18th of April, 2014. (For justifiable cases, we do uphold a tolerance period of fifteen days.)

Please use the following template for your submission:

First: Author(s);

Second: Affiliation, if any;

Third: Email Address;

Fourth: Title of Abstract and Proposal;

Fifth: The 400 to 500 Word Abstract.

To submit an abstract online follow these steps:

1) Go to our webpage:  HYPERLINK “http://www.alternative-academia.net” www.alternative-academia.net

2) Select your Symposium of choice within the list of annual events (listed by period and city)

3) Go to LOG IN at the top of the page

4) Create a User Name and Password for our system and log in

5) Click on the Call for Papers for the Symposium

6) Go to the end of the Call for Papers page and click on the First Step of Submission Process button

7) Follow the instructions provided for completing the abstract submission process

For every abstract proposal submitted, we acknowledge receipt. If you do not receive a reply from us within three days, you should assume the submission process was not completed successfully. Please try again or contact our technical support for clarifications.

All presentation and paper proposals that address these questions and issues will be fully considered and evaluated. Evaluation of abstract submissions will be ongoing, from the opening date of Monday 14th of October, 2013. All Prospective Delegates can expect a reply time to their submission of three weeks.

Accepted abstracts will require a full draft paper by Friday 2nd of May, 2014. Papers are for a 20 minute presentation, 8 to 10 pages long, double spaced, Times New Roman 12. All papers presented at the symposium are eligible for publication as part of a digital or paperback book.

We invite colleagues and people interested in participating to disseminate this call for papers. Thank you for sharing and cross-listing where and whenever appropriate.

Hope to meet you in Toronto!

Symposium Coordinators:

Wendy O’Brien

Professor of Social and Political Theory

School of Liberal Studies

Humber Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Email: Wendy.OBrien@humber.ca

Marina Kaneti

PhD Candidate, Politics

New School for Social Research

New York, New York

Email: kanem368@newschool.edu

Alejandro Cervantes-Carson

General Coordinator

International Network for Alternative Academia

Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain

Email: acc@alternative-academia.net

*****

Informational Note:

Alternative Academia is an international network of intellectuals, academics, independent scholars and practitioners committed to creating spaces, both within and beyond traditional academe, for creative, trans-disciplinary and critical thinking on current debates and key themes. We offer annual and biannual symposiums at sites around the world, providing forums that foster the development of new frames of reference and innovative structures for the production and expansion of knowledge. Dialogue, discussion and deliberation define both the methods employed and the values upheld by this network.

Visit our website at: www.alternative-academia.net

Mar 272014
 

Posted by greydogg, 99GetSmart

Ad Pic INAA at Humber, May 2014

Late Spring Period, May of 2014

Symposia Period: Monday 12th to Monday 26th of May

Institutional Partner: Humber College

Venue: Humber Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning, Lakeshore Campus 

City: Toronto, Ontario, Canada

————————————————————————–

Reinventing Citizenship (RC)

Symposium: 7th

Research Program: Protest, Justice and Deliberative Power

Dates: Monday 12th to Wednesday 14th of May, 2014

(Abstract Deadline: Monday 14th of April, Paper Due: Monday 29th of April)

General Break: Thursday 15th of May, 2014

* Full information below

————————————————————————–

7th International Symposium: Reinventing Citizenship

Part of the Research Program on: Protest, Justice and Deliberative Power

International Network for Alternative Academia – Extends a general invitation to participate 

Enquiries: acc@alternative-academia.net

Monday 12th to Wednesday 14th of May, 2014

Institutional Partner: Humber ITAL

Venue: Humber Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning

Lakeshore Campus (Building: Lakeshore Commons)

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Call for Papers

(Abstract Submission Period Opened: Monday 14th of October, 2013)

(Abstract Deadline: Monday 14th of April, 2014)

This trans-disciplinary research project is interested in exploring the current relevance and value of citizenship in democracies across the world. We seek to identify central problems of the experience of being a citizen today and evaluate to what degree is citizenship a good vehicle for democratic agency in contemporary societies.

For almost half a century, political regimes across the world have struggled with citizen participation and the legitimacy problems this creates for the political process. As a result politics has increasingly been seen as a highly formal, specialized and separate domain from the everyday life and needs of citizens. Perhaps nowhere has the gulf that has formed become more evident than with regard to our understanding of the concept of citizenship itself. While boundaries between nations and the composition of resident populations have become increasingly more fluid and diverse, citizenship and the legal frames that sustain national politics have shown a shocking resilience to change, short capacity to increase inclusion and a rather rigid response to decades of massive migration and global change. Many now have dual or multiple citizenships and are connected to more than one body politic and legal framework. Simultaneously, the numbers of permanent residents of countries that refuse to grant them citizenship and formal access to politics continues to increase. How are old models of citizenship evolving? With what effects? Can these changes be initiated within existing political systems? Do social movements that advocate sidestepping states and formal politics altogether, movements that seek to generate their own forms of political representation and membership point the way towards the future of citizenship?

We invite colleagues from all disciplines and professions interested in exploring and explaining these issues in a collective, deliberative and dialogical environment to send presentation proposals (based on theoretical and/or empirical projects) which address these general questions or the following themes:

1. Visualizing: Rethinking Citizenship

- Has the ideal of citizen lost its meaning in 21st century? Has it lost its relevance? Should we abandon the concept all together or take on the task of its re-conceptualization?

- What are the routes we should take for reinventing a conception of citizenship that responds to the current transnational trends of world mobility and life?

- Is it possible to unhinge citizenship from the nation-state? How would this be done in conceptual, political and practical terms?

- Is there a way of thinking of citizenship devoid of loyalty to a nation or even multiple nations, but rather anchored in a different set of principles, responsibilities, obligations and cosmopolitan civic commitments?

- Why does citizenship need national anchoring? Is it possible to move the link up to an international level and down to a local one, in order to re-shape both rights and responsibilities?

- How can we conceive of a new definition of citizenship that is global, transnational, multiple and multifaceted? How can we move the definition of citizenship away from the notion and practices of exclusion and closer to that of inclusion?

- Might the rethinking of citizenship entail abandoning the idea all together and seeking for a different form of political relationship?

2. Zooming In: What Is Lost? What Is Broken?

- What accounts of citizenship are offered to us from across history? What are the relative strengths and weaknesses of their adoption in addressing 21st century social, cultural and political life?

- What is the relationship between citizenship and allegiance, loyalty and trust? Should not democracy itself and democratic relationships be what defines allegiance, loyalty and trust?

- What is the current place of political accountability to citizens? Are political democratic systems accountable to citizens? Is accountability being strengthened by politics and democratic practice? How so and what are the links and processes of this relationship?

- How can citizens expand their participation in decision-making processes? How can citizens ensure that democratic politics is exercised, not only their name but in their benefit? How can citizens regain their power over political systems?

- How are the lines between citizen, worker, resident and consumer being redrawn?

- Who is included and who is excluded from the ranks of citizen through the introduction of citizenship tests? What are these tests seeking to affirm?

- How should we think of the relationship between citizenship and security? Is it legitimate to redefine citizenship based on ideas of security? How so and what are the limits? Are these limits justified by democratic rights and responsibilities?

- Are we not giving up rights and responsibilities by accepting principles of national security?

3. Second Take: Current Experiences of Alternative Citizenship 

- What is the relationship between residency and citizenship? Is there any way we can embody denizen ship with legal rights and a constitutional persona? Would this be a way of inserting new significance to citizenship?

- Can we conceive of local community political relationships that are good examples for new models citizenship? What lessons can we derive from these experiences and how can we use them for the renovation of the roots of citizenship?

- How do these local experiences relate to established and legal definitions of citizenship? What might be there contributions to the formal and informal ways of rethinking citizenship?

- What are the relative merits and demerits of dual and multi-national citizenship? Aside from facilitating travel and residency for global travelers and residents, are there additional considerations we can extend to single citizenship status?

- What happens when allegiances conflict? Is there a prior citizenship right? How is it to be established, from an international legal perspective?

- What happens with local, regional and transnational experiences that contest the nation state’s legitimacy and decide to side step them to exercise their conceptions of citizenship? Are their virtues in these practices? What lessons can we derive from them both for citizenship and democracy?

- Are there new models and political relationships emerging from local, regional and international experiences that speak to new forms of democratic political life? Are these just revamping old ideas of democratic citizenship or creating new conceptions with their practices?

4. Artistic Scene: Aestheticizing Citizenship 

- In what ways is art being employed as a means for redefining and reconfiguring political identity at both the personal and societal level? How much do these aesthetic experiences seep into the fabric of social life?

- How can we explore the productive effect of art on forms conceptions of citizenship?

- How is art and art expression responding to the need to redefine citizenship? How might art serve as a model in the creation of new ways of experiencing politics, political participation and citizenship?

- How can we participate and foster processes of critical and creative aesthetic innovation for citizenship perception and political agency?

- Can art insert playfulness and joy, pleasure and fun in conceptions of politics and the exercise of citizenship?

- Can the aesthetization of protest and contestation contribute to a de-formalization of citizenship and bring about a more joyful exercise of political rights and duties? Is there other ways for regaining the joy in political participation?

- How can citizenship and political participation be seen as a festival or a social festivity? Would this have an impact over political participation? Would this have an effect over how citizens relate to politics? Would this suggest new ways definitions of the exercise of rights and duties?

5. Stand Still: Normative Renewal and Building New Citizenship 

- What are the current conditions for the possibility of citizenship? How are these conditions being reconfigured by new technologies and globalization?

- Can we even think of the possibilities of international citizenship? How so and what would it require? Is this a productive route to pursue for the renewal of citizenship?

- What is the impact of international organizations on conceptions of national citizenship? How have basic ideas been reformulated?

- How are norms of citizenship being modified and changed within nations? How are international normative formulations being contested and challenged?

- How is trans-nationalism challenging traditional conceptions of the rights of participation in political processes?

- What is the future of passports, visas and citizenship cards? Should we continue to identify citizenship belonging in this way? How can/how will citizenship be identified?

- How are normative frameworks of democratic citizenship holding up to contestation and challenge within national borders and from transnational social and political movements?

If you are interested in participating in this Annual Symposium, submit a 400 to 500 word abstract as soon as possible and no later than Monday 14th of April, 2014. (For justifiable cases, we do uphold a tolerance period of fifteen days.)

Please use the following template for your submission:

First: Author(s);

Second: Affiliation, if any;

Third: Email Address;

Fourth: Title of Abstract and Proposal;

Fifth: The 400 to 500 Word Abstract.

To submit an abstract online follow these steps:

1) Go to our webpage:  HYPERLINK “http://www.alternative-academia.net” www.alternative-academia.net

2) Select your Symposium of choice within the list of annual events (listed by period and city)

3) Go to LOG IN at the top of the page

4) Create a User Name and Password for our system and log in

5) Click on the Call for Papers for the Symposium

6) Go to the end of the Call for Papers page and click on the First Step of Submission Process button

7) Follow the instructions provided for completing the abstract submission process

For every abstract proposal submitted, we acknowledge receipt. If you do not receive a reply from us within three days, you should assume the submission process was not completed successfully. Please try again or contact our technical support for clarifications.

All presentation and paper proposals that address these questions and issues will be fully considered and evaluated. Evaluation of abstract submissions will be ongoing, from the opening date of Monday 14th of October, 2013. All Prospective Delegates can expect a reply time to their submission of three weeks.

Accepted abstracts will require a full draft paper by Monday 29th of April, 2014. Papers are for a 20 minute presentation, 8 to 10 pages long, double spaced, Times New Roman 12. All papers presented at the symposium are eligible for publication as part of a digital or paperback book.

We invite colleagues and people interested in participating to disseminate this call for papers. Thank you for sharing and cross-listing where and whenever appropriate.

Hope to meet you in Toronto!

Symposium Coordinators:

Marina Kaneti

PhD Candidate, Politics

New School for Social Research

New York, New York

Email: kanem368@newschool.edu

Alejandro Cervantes-Carson

General Coordinator

International Network for Alternative Academia

Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain

Email: acc@alternative-academia.net

*****

Informational Note:

Alternative Academia is an international network of intellectuals, academics, independent scholars and practitioners committed to creating spaces, both within and beyond traditional academe, for creative, trans-disciplinary and critical thinking on current debates and key themes. We offer annual and biannual symposiums at sites around the world, providing forums that foster the development of new frames of reference and innovative structures for the production and expansion of knowledge. Dialogue, discussion and deliberation define both the methods employed and the values upheld by this network.

Visit our website at: www.alternative-academia.net

Apr 252013
 

Posted by greydogg, 99GetSmart

In response to the Chicago Public Schools’ plan to close more than 50 schools in June, some CPS high school juniors are boycotting the standardized Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE) test today.

The state mandates the PSAE and students have to take it in order to graduate, but organizers of the campaign say it’s the students’ First Amendment right to protest the test.

Some of the students and other education activists also plan to give a letter to the Chicago Board of Education in opposition of the district’s school closing proposal.

Here’s more about why some students are skipping the test:

Yesterday, Chicago Public Schools officials sent letters home and robo-called the homes of students urging that parents send their children to school today.

The district also released a statement about the continued concerns surrounding the effect the school closure plan will have on the safety of students:

Ensuring the safety and security of our students is CPS’s top priority. That’s why we continue to partner with the Chicago Police Department, as well as community- and faith-based organizations, to create customized safety plans for each welcoming school. This will include an expansion of our successful Safe Passage program, in which Safe Passage workers stand post along safe routes that are specially designed by CPS and CPD. These workers know their neighborhood and provide the extra set of eyes and ears to proactively identify and report safety risks. Since 2009, Safe Passage has resulted in increased attendance, fewer in-school incidents and decreased criminal activity around Safe Passage routes and the schools they serve.

Chicago Student’s Boycott Information:

Find out more, contact us at: 
csosos.chicago@gmail.com
www.facebook.com/csosos

Check out Brian Sturgis Youth Leader
https://soundcloud.com/csosos/brian-s…

Links to know your rights at CPS
http://www.cps.edu/Documents/Resource…

VOYCE Coordinator Emma Tai
http://dianeravitch.net/2013/04/21/ch…

Check me out
https://www.facebook.com/ARCADEKID1

Follow them on twitter @ChiStudentsOrg
hash-tag #cpsboycott

All music is third party own by Eminem: Lose Yourself

Created By Tre-Walker

Source: ABC 7

SOLIDARITY TO CHICAGO STUDENTS!

Dec 292012
 

 An Interview with Luc Frieden, Finance Minister of Luxembourg

By Iddhis Bing, 99GetSmart

Luxembourg Finance Minister Luc Frieden

Luxembourg Finance Minister Luc Frieden

Of great wealth there is no real use, except in its distribution, the rest is just conceit. Francis Bacon

Tax havens and fiscal paradises, what they are and how they work, are the subject of the Invisible Money series. Some 67 trillion USD moves in and out of what is now called the “shadow banking system,” a staggering amount, enough to put EU or US budgets back in surplus if it were properly accounted for. (As if, you sigh.) The series has taken a close look at Luxembourg, a notorious tax haven, and how it manages to operate within the structure of European Union governance. Switzerland gets the bad press and deservedly so – but it is not a member of the EU. Luxembourg is, and so, beyond the dubious legality of its tax regime, questions concerning exchange of information and cooperation between EU states are unavoidable, as well as its membership in international bodies like the OECD.  (Ireland and Liechtenstein also come to mind as a kind of Premiere League of EU tax havens.)

As noted elsewhere in the series, Luc Frieden is public point man for Luxembourg’s ingenious interpretation of European law. Frieden is the heir apparent in Luxembourg and he, not Vice-Premier and Foreign Minister Jean Asselborn, takes the lead in the tricky business of fending off attacks on Luxembourg’s status quo. He is on record as saying, “Our financial approach is totally European and applies all laws in the struggle against financial criminality.” But what goes on in Luxembourg, stays in Luxembourg.

Readers of Nicholas Shaxson’s Treasure Islands will remember more than one instance of the rebuffs inquiring reporters got when asking around about who’s who and how things work. Things can even get lethal in places like the Cayman Islands or at the very least, damn unpleasant if you ask too many questions on the isle of Jersey. Hence, getting the top dog to answer questions is a bit of a coup.

Although there is no “gotcha” moment in the interview, it is instructive to watch a member of what used to be called the permanent government bob and weave, fending off attacks and keeping the truth at a comfortable remove. Governors of fiscal paradises only rarely make a public defense of their actions. This short transcript serves as an open window into a closed house.

The interview with Luc Frieden is part of Edouard Perrin’s documentary. It can be seen in full here

Elise Lucet is the interviewer for the Cash Investigations series. Lucas Frieden is the Minister of Finance in Luxembourg’s Juncker/Asselborn government and is the man in charge of their extremely laissez faire fiscal regime, which, one is inclined to believe, he knows something about.

*

Cash Investigations: We’ve seen a lot of those documents. They cover Liechtenstein, the Caymen Islands and… Luxembourg. If we’re talking about tax havens, we find you, Luxembourg, in the middle of those schemes.

Lucas Frieden: We abide by European law, which is not the case with all the countries you just mentioned. We should be compared to the UK and the Netherlands.

CI: So you reject the term tax haven?

LF: Absolutely. It’s an insult to my country because Luxembourg abides by every single OECD convention and we work in close cooperation with every single EU state. You cannot prove that Luxembourg does not adhere to EU law.

CI: But we’ve seen all the [tax haven] schemes and you’re in league with those countries. You say it’s an insult to your country to be called a tax haven but you are always mentioned with those other countries. So, according to you, are Liechtenstein and the Caymens fiscal paradises?

LF: I’m not sufficiently versed in the tax laws of those countries or regions to be able to judge.

CI: You’re kicking off-side.

LF: No, I don’t want to judge in a superficial manner.

CI: If a large French company makes use of a subsidiary in Luxembourg, a non-active subsidiary, and succeeds in avoiding taxes in France, what happens?

LF: If it’s contrary to European law, and if the French mention it to us, I will take care to make sure it doesn’t happen.

CI: You won’t bring it up yourself?

LF: I would only be aware of it if the French tell me there’s a problem.

CI: You can guess that this presents a problem -

LF: You suppose that it’s always that way but you never raise a question about whether a contrary might exist. When laws are not the same in every single country, it is highly possible that a company in another country reduces their taxes somewhere else through a subsidiary. It’s not against the law. If there are abuses, I will make sure they are stopped because I don’t want to live off another country, to which we owe so much and with which we enjoy excellent relations.

CI: So you will stay with this approach?

LF: Absolutely.

CI: If you pledge that in the future there will be contact between your country and other countries and say, here we are, we are going to sign these agreements, would that not be to the detriment of the services you offer?

LF: I could imagine that that could be one way of doing things. Once again, with respect to European law, to enhance cooperation between European countries -

CI: So, according to you it’s a bit shocking -

LF: The way you present things, yes, because it suggests that people escape their own legislation.

CI: That’s the impression we got. Frankly, we looked at the activity of those companies, British and French, in your country, and they are not strikingly active here in Luxembourg. What is striking is the absence of real activity here in your country.

LF: I am not an expert regarding shell companies but one does not need to have many employees to be able to say it’s a real company. There are rules, European and OECD rules, regarding a stable company.

CI: When a French company has an office which it shares along with 31 other subsidiaries and where, quite blatantly, nothing goes on except for financial movement, for you as Finance Minister in Luxembourg, is this something you find shocking? I need to know your real position on this.

LF: Yes. If the description you made is accurate, I find it unacceptable.

CI: When the ATAs allow GlaxoSmithKline, for example, to avoid paying 40 million in taxes in their country, it’s a problem, isn’t it?

LF: Yes, I agree.

CI: By the way, it created problems with Revenue in the UK.

LF: Yes. I fully understand that but we have to know what the solution to such problems would be because creating subsidiaries is not illegal per se.

CI: If they are void of any real substance, it raises serious questions.

LF: Yes.

*

Apart from his sterling manners, Frieden’s defense essentially reduces to I have no way of knowing and when pushed, prove we’re breaking the rules – all of which beggars belief coming from the mouth of a government minister. It hardly seems enough – but it’s working. Interestingly, Frieden points his finger – correctly – at the UK, by which he means the City of London, certainly the greatest facilitator of illegal cash flows in the world today. (We’re just small fry around here.)

And as we shall surely see sooner rather than later, everyone is involved, from pop stars to budget ministers. Does that mean Luc Frieden again ? No, Jérôme Cahuzac in France. When Perrin’s documentary won the Louise Wiese Award, the French journalist Paul Moreira said in dismay, “Edouard Perrin’s stunning investigation wins the Louise Weiss Prize and the Budget Ministry completely fails to react… We’re not talking about peanuts but tens of billions of Euros. It could give the Budget Ministry a few ideas.” In early December the website Mediapart published an inadvertant phone recording of Budget Minister Cahuzac discussing his secret Swiss account. (Not enough to cost him his position, so the experts say. Even Copé has rushed to his defense.) Pardon the Minister if he doesn’t get too tough on Luxembourg. He understands the need for secrecy, for putting a little aside for a rainy day. And dammit, if he had just hung up the phone correctly, none of this would be public. The Cahuzac interlude is a portrait, in miniature, of the way the system survives and flourishes.

Interestingly, in November, Avinash Persaud, no small fry himself (Chairman of Intelligence Capital Limited, Senior Fellow with the Caribbean Policy Research Institute and Co-Chair of the OECD Emerging Market Network) speculated that when push comes to shove, countries like Luxembourg would go along with a reform that puts the places like the Cayman Islands out of business. “The large financial centres are going to try, and have been trying, to strangle the Caribbean banking sectors,” Persaud stated. A bit like a declaration of war.

Where does that leave us ? Is it nearly High Noon among the warring Secrecy and Acquisition Clans ? Every system has the limitations particular to it built in, and it’s no surprise to learn that capitalists despise each other and will, under pressure, turn other members of their class out. So, please, enough of the polite manners. For the next act, the crocadiles, under the increasingly watchful eyes of the crowd, will tear each other to pieces. Stand back, ladies and gentlemen. The show is just getting under way.

 

Iddhis Bing

For the full text of Invisible Money 5, see elsewhere on this site or Ground Report/Iddhis Bing.

————

Invisible Money Series by Iddhis Bing:

- Invisible Money 1: How It Gets That Way: http://99getsmart.com/?p=4736

- Invisible Money 2: Voyage to Luxembourg: http://99getsmart.com/?p=4914

- Invisible Money 3: http://99getsmart.com/?p=5319

- Invisible Money 4: Of Luxembourg, London and Paris, and a Lady Named Merkiavelli: http://99getsmart.com/?p=5411

- Invisible Money 5: The cloud Factory Revisited Up The Ladder, Marius Kohl to Luc Frieden: http://99getsmart.com/invisible-money-5-the-cloud-factory-revisited-up-the-ladder-marius-kohl-to-luc-frieden/

Dec 272012
 

Many thanks to GreyDog for posting my article from the Invisible Money series.

For those who can bear it, all my political pieces are archived at GroundReport (http://www.groundreport.com/JIBing) and I write about art and culture for NY Arts, but as their site is in some sort of hazy-maybe reconstruction, good luck!

In a day or so I will post the full transcript of the ElistLucet/Cash Investigation Luc Frieden one-on-one from Perrin’s film. Nothing precisely revelatory but it is a rare occasion when one of the honchos at a tax haven lets himself be grilled by the press, and the Logic of Avoidance is on full display.

So, we made it though the End of the World. Next up, end of the year. End of Time?

 

 

Sep 062012
 

StopCartel TV will broadcast LIVE on location in Salonica in Northern Greece on SATURDAY 9 September at 6pm local time @ http://www.livestream.com/stopcarteltvgr

The StopCartel TV crew will livestream protests, rallies, marches and demonstrations of Greek citizens against the regime.

Congratulations to StopCartel TV crew! 

Since 2006 StopCartel TV has logged over 1000 livestream hours in the streets – with reports, talks and comments on current developments in Greece, both in English and Greek.

Please help support the work of independent media:

ONGOING FUNDRAISER for StopCartel Livestream from Athens: http://stopcarteltv.chipin.com/stopcartel

StopCartel TV broadcasts LIVE from Athens, Greece weeknights @ 6 pm Athens time @ http://www.livestream.com/stopcarteltvgr