Nov 142013
 

By J. Iddhis Bing, 99GetSmart

Greeks protest austerity cuts in Syntagma Square, Athens. Photography by Elias Theodoropoulos

Greeks protest austerity cuts in Syntagma Square, Athens. Photography by Elias Theodoropoulos

It’s hard work getting the news from the news these days, especially if you want to know about a country like Greece. Far-away birthplace of democracy, a bit exotic, Mediterranean lifestyle, Zorba, rumored to be different. What does any of that mean? Strange things are happening there but what is going on precisely? The Greeks ran up quite a tab at the bar, or so the financial dailies tell us on a regular basis.

Almost everything we read is filtered through the point of view of the Troika – the IMF, the European Central Bank and the European Commission – or the Greek government. We know that representatives of the Troika – established during the first stage of Greece’s “rescue” in May 2010 – have been in Greece since Tuesday of last week, meeting with the Greek government about the latest round of potential bailouts for that country. Beyond the leaks from either side, the rest, for us at any rate, is guesswork.

As of Tuesday evening, November 12, no decision had been announced. The Troika is typically very business-like with its clients, out with the whip, sign here, see you later – and then the next round of what the press like to call “belt-tightening” begins. The coalition government survived a no-confidence vote on Monday the 11th but that hardly quelled the sense that they are a very fragile edifice indeed. The people are out in the streets on a constant basis. They’re an after-thought, at least as far as the world’s media is concerned.

We do know a few things: that the Troika is a quasi-legal junta, created during the first stage of Greece’s trauma. The IMF was invited to the party at the insistence of Angela Merkel. Readers with long memories may remember that Dominique Strauss-Kahn was on his way to meet Merkel to present his plan to “save Greece,” when he was abruptly detained in New York.

The Troika’s mission is to enforce an austerity program that includes the selling-off of government assets and the decimation of public services, and that even within the IMF, there is dissension over the absurd goal of turning Greece into a productive satellite of Germany. We also know or suspect that any “bailout” of Greece will only impoverish the country yet further. That’s the public record regarding employment, savings, pensions, access to housing and food. You can read it here on Ground Report and find it many other places as well.

Language, meanwhile, gets so knocked around by the pros it throws its hands up in despair. Defeat comes at the price of rational thought: being rescued by the Troika means becoming a pauper in your own country, means your pension has vanished, you are a month or so away from losing the roof over your head and your hand is in the garbage looking for food.

None of the rescues perpetrated by the Troika have successfully rescued their target countries but instead have pitched them ever further into chaos. Bailouts are not a transfusion of money but a way of channeling money from one country (Germany, in this case) to another country (Greece) where the money is then re-routed to banks in, among other places, Germany and France in the form of debt payments.

The conservative government of Prime Minister Antonis Samaras, along with his coalition partner, Socialist Evangelos Venizelos, is said to be desperate not to tamper with what they consider Greece’s “success story,” one which includes massive unemployment and at least 20 percent of the population dependent on soup kitchens for the next meal. His figure is 700 million Euros to meet the debt payment schedule. The Troika is said to be looking for 2.9 billion Euros in savings from the current budget.

That explains the lack of an agreement since last Tuesday at least in part. The Troika is being held hostage. Round One to Greece.

Spectacularly, no one in the government mentions the list of 2,062 Greeks who are holding at least $1.95 billion in secret Swiss bank accounts. A list the government has had in its possession for at least three years without a single prosecution. (Interested readers can learn more here.) Articles in the local press do muse a bit about “tax collection” being a bit in arrears but without much enthusiasm.

Rumblings, such as they are, continue to be at such a low volume they can be hard to hear. Internal documents leaked from the IMF last week reveal that as early as May 2010, more than 40 IMF member states, all outside Europe, were opposed to the aid plan drawn up for Athens. (This in a report from last week’s Wall Street Journal.) The Troika itself is said to be headed for divorce. “The ECB must refrain from intervening in highly political decisions with its advice on taxes or cuts in spending. And yet that is just what it has been doing inside the troika. It must get out of it as soon as possible,” says Paul De Grauwe, a professor at the London School of Economics. In June of this year, a high official at the IMF publicly disagreed with the Troika’s agenda in Greece.

Even the pro-government publication Ekathimerini paints a decidedly gloomy picture: “Unfortunately, what this means in practical terms is that the current political system is not in a position to lead the country any further in terms of reforms. It doesn’t truly believe in these reforms and it does not have the stamina to clash with its traditional clientele,” writes Alexis Papachelas on November 10. Not exactly a ringing endorsement from a pro-government journo.

In other words: it isn’t working, it isn’t working at all, and yet our bedazzled technocrats continue to insist that it does, even if they don’t particularly believe it either. It’s the way the world does its “business.” Consider this: the Financial Times reported last weekend that Stephen King, chief economist at HSBC, “discovered” that nearly all of his bank’s country forecasts stated that the country-in-question planned to export its way to growth. (Ah, growth, endless growth. The Holy Grail, the never-ending rainbow at the end of the road. Line it up next to the other sacred cows, bailouts and rescues, and fire away.) Where they will all export to is the question, with every other country on earth frantically exporting its way to prosperity. Mars and Venus are at the head of the list, and why not? (William Pfaff has more on this.)

Greece lost some 35,000 jobs in October. So much for that success story. My sense is that the Troika’s technocrats simply live too high up in the stratosphere – somewhere near their very own cloud 9 – to be concerned with anything so gritty as jobs or hunger or survival. For them “the people” are an abstraction on the order of heroic rescues and bailouts.

The Washington Consensus is dead. Long Live the Consensus! The world, meanwhile, hangs by a thread. No one believes, fewer and fewer people vote and countries like Greece twist in the wind. Who reaps the advantage? The far right, the angry ones, the xenophobes who see us lined against each other in a global race to the End of the Line. One wonders exactly when Angela Merkel and that ardent enemy of finance François Hollande will get the message. (Before or after the rainbow? Place your bets here.)

The Troika, intent on getting in and out of Greece quickly with as few questions asked as possible, seem to have gotten stuck in transit. On Tuesday night, they were so afraid of angry cleaning ladies demonstrating in front of the Finance Ministry that they crawled on hands and knees out the building’s fire-escape to an underground garage en route to their own private cloud. That might not be, to employ yet another word that’s taken a few body blows, progress, but if a modern-day Aristophanes was anywhere nearby, he can make use of it.

As of Wednesday morning, November 13, no agreement between Greece and the IMF was in sight.When there is one, we’ll take a close look at it to see if there are any changes to the formula that has had such devastating consequences for Greece.

Jun 232013
 

Posted by greydogg, 99GetSmart

From StopCartel Newsdesk:

It is the first time the two major factions of the new regime are trying to live together in the most shameless manner, openly before the eyes of the People. Democracy and PASOK, have for the first time, shown their true face and the political essence of the so-called “post-dictatorship”

The faces of Greek traitors: Venizelos and Samaras

Venizelos and Samaras

The tragicomic political developments in the government camp , which sparked the case of ERT , continues unabated after the formal, but not substantial withdrawal of Tourism Services .

The New Democracy and PASOK , seeking now not only a new framework for cooperation , but also a reshuffle of the government scheme that will enable them to impart an artificial fake note “progressivism” and “renewal” in the hope that such things will extend even and for a few months , they remain in power .

It is therefore expected,  the two “mnimoniakes” factions that first time in the years of the new regime will live together without another government partner , engage in an ‘orgy’ contacts, fermentation and classification , in an attempt to appease as soon as possible , concerns of lenders and the European Union on political developments .

Amidst such, bleak landscape , the tripartite government turns into bipartisan , even pretending he is determined to exhaust the four years . A contingency in which one no longer believes , as the country has entered irreversibly on track elections .Elections, which will require a great social majority in order to put an end to austerity and the destruction of the place for aprogressive way out of the current crisis with socialist horizon.

The revision of the terms of the loan agreement that enhance the recession appears to be the main objective of the program agreement SW-PASOK, which process the partisan staffs.

In fact it is the first time that the two major factions of the new regime are trying to live together without other partners.

The new programming agreement have undertaken to formulate the Chrisanthos Lazaridis from ND and Paris Koukoulopoulos by PASOK.

The text will refer and institutional issues to be resolved, such as corruption, the fight against political money, the “breaking” of large regions, but the “hard” issues of anti-racism law and the immigration issue.

The pursuit of partisan staffs is later than T riti have completed their discussions and the final version is to the offices of Antonis Samaras and Evangelos Venizelos.

SYRIZA: Scaling of extreme austerity mnimoniakis 

“The New Democracy and PASOK looking for a new framework agreement and a new government scheme that will escalate toextreme mnimoniaki policy of austerity and authoritarianism , “said SYRIZA.

“With increasing their social isolation and their political obsolescence , as they become more plainly the impasses mnimoniakis policy, both seem more determined to dismantle every social right and every public good ‘, highlighted the announcement of Koumoundouros.

Moreover, the position that “the current government is much weaker” expressed MP SYRIZA Dimitris Stratoulis , speaking to T / T Mega.

Still appreciate that the new government scheme ‘ will apply the same mnimoniaki policy and applies it worse “and that” in September will be forced de facto to discuss new measures and new memorandum. ”

At the same time, Mr. Stratoulis not exclude the possibility to file SYRIZA censure.

As he said, “we will see in the coming days is a weapon we have in mind. When used should be effective. ”

KKE: signaled an escalation of aggression against the people

“Changes in the government scheme and the new programming agreement SW – PASOK, with the connivance of Tourism Services , mark the escalation of aggression against the people and workers, through the new unpopular measures in the offing, “observes the KKE .

In a statement stating that ” the people have a wealth of experience to find that it can not be pinned their hopes on the control of his own harsh reality, in various disguises government or any other government that bows to capitalistic “one-way” and the EU. ”

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Mar 142013
 

By Anthony Verias, WeAreChange GREECE

 Live2 & Apset, “FaceArt”, Carpe Diem's mural program during 15th Biennial, Polytechnic area, Thessaloniki, 2011

Live2 & Apset, “FaceArt”, Carpe Diem’s mural program during 15th Biennial, Polytechnic area, Thessaloniki, 2011

By now you have probably heard of a certain UK based graffiti artist who goes by the name of Banksy, who has gained enormous fame with his politically charged works. A movie loosely based on himself was even nominated for an Oscar! So what does this all prove? That there is an ENORMOUS market for graffiti tourism, so much so that maps are made to better locate that elusive Bansky piece. One such piece is rumored to be on the Greek island of Corfu. This island as well as others have seen a sharp decline in tourism since the start of the crisis. Tourism is right at the heart of the Greek economy with jobs in that sector accounting for 1 out of 5. The high season is of course in the summer, people come for the islands and to view the ancient art of Athens. Though, a movement of modern art could be a bright spot for the future of Greece’s economy. Carpe Diem is the team that is responsible for the urban treasures popping up all over Greece, creating an artistic revitalization; the likes of which the country has not seen for decades. Albert Einstein once said that “crises bring progress” and “creativity is born from anguish”. The anguish caused by the crisis has allowed the arts and creativity to flourish in the Northern port city of Thessaloniki.

I got to witness that anguish and creativity firsthand on the way home from intense riots which occurred after protests commemorating the 1973 fall of the military Junta. As I was leaving this scene of carnage; fire and smoke hanging in the air, with my eyes still stinging from the tear gas, it was this mural which gave me hope for Greece. Hope had so quickly grown from despair. In reality, there are reasons to be optimistic about Greece’s future everywhere you look; you just need to know where to look. Fragile bar is just one of the places which gives hope to a country so desperately in need of it. Media the world over have also stood up and took notice of the cultural and artistic revival in Greece, with the NYT noting “Salonika’s youth are embracing a do-it-yourself ethos resulting in a wave of arts and night-life venues that they hope will hold up in tough times”. Fragile Bar is a prime example of Greeks coping and even persevering in the face of great adversity.

It is clear that the work of graffiti artists gives the country an esthetic boost and the expansion of this art-form has certainly grown rapidly since the start of the crisis, but can it’s presence offer Greece anything more than a “face-lift”? For this answer I turned to Kiriakos Iosifidis, organizer and founding member of Carpe Diem. Carpe Diem is the team responsible for transforming dilapidated spaces into public works of art.

Kiriakos believes that bringing some “color” into a communities everyday life can go a long way as far as lifting it’s spirits and as a citizen of Thessaloniki where his work is prominently displayed I can firmly attest to that.

Carpe Diem mural

Carpe Diem mural

SEE MORE PUBLIC WORKS OF ART here and here

TO DONATE TO CARPE DIEM THROUGH PAYPAL USE EMAIL carpediemact@gmail.com